GOLD GLITTERS ALL THE WAY: RSBL

As I mentioned last week in my blog that gold is regaining its safe haven appeal, this week we saw this sentiment strengthening further.

Gold was like literally all over the world this week as we saw the yellow metal gaining its safe haven appeal in its true sense after a long wait. Sentiment in the gold market remained sturdy after prices hit a one-year high in a figurative move.

This was the third consecutive week that gold witnessed positive gains, with increasing more than 5.3%- the biggest weekly percentage gain since late October 2011.

Analysts have noted that the yellow metal’s push back above $1,200 an ounce generated a lot of focus and positive sentiment among appalling investors looking for a safe-haven.

Many analysts are bullish on gold, expecting sentiment to continue to grow as prices have broken through key technical barriers, culminating in a weekly high at $1,263.90 an ounce.

Spot gold was last at $1,240.50/1,241.20 per ounce, having rallied around 22 percent since the start of the year.

The gold price rallied to a high on Thursday of $1,263.30 per ounce, up five percent and it’s strongest since February 6 last year when it peaked at $1,268.90.

Since this rally came in suddenly, there were many investors that missed on to bank on the gains. The speed of the rally and its strength suggest many would-be investors have been chasing prices, having not been able to take advantage earlier in the rally – they had lost faith in gold as a safe-haven given the four-year bear market.

This volatility was influenced by more than one factor. It was a combined effort of the following-

Dollar- Sentiment towards gold has changed dramatically, and gold has even moved up on some days in the face of a dollar rally. With a change in sentiment, those underweight or waiting on the sidelines started buying gold which furtherer fuelled gold prices.

The precious metal benefitted from a softer dollar, which had failed to attract safe-haven demand despite the global instability – the currency was last trading at a four-month low at $1.1349 against the euro.

A softer dollar is making gold more affordable for holders of other currencies – it has fallen around four percent this month, having already rallied strongly over the past 14 months – the dollar index climbed to 100.50 in December from around 70 in January last year and was last at 95.58.

Fed- As part of a two-day congressional hearing, Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen attempted to reassure markets that US growth was steady and the labor market was improving.

Yellen and her fellow colleagues are being criticized for exacerbating the instability after raising rates in December – rates were static around 0 percent since December 2008.

And the US Federal Reserve, having raised rates in December for the first time in nine years, has not ruled out a push into negative territory. The chances of further rises this year have receded significantly, according to market consensus.

Because gold has no yield, it loses some of its luster when interest rates are rising. But negative interest rates negate this disadvantage while highlighting economic weakness against which gold is historically seen as a hedge and preferred as one of the safest modes of investments compared to its counterpart.

China- since the Chinese markets remained closed for the Lunar Celebration, there was nil reaction from that side and hence gold prices shot up one side.

With China absent from the market for its New Year holidays this week, the market now waits to see the reaction of Chinese investors upon their return on Monday, particularly as the US will be absent on this day for Presidents day.

All eyes will be glued to the return of the Chinese markets as investors are eager to see what they actually bring to the surface post this week’s volatile developments.

Equity- The gold price benefited from the meltdown in equity markets, as the yellow metal continued to hold around one-year highs. Weak equity markets have spooked investors and they promptly dumped risky assets and rushed to gold, which is seen as a safe-haven.

Other Economies-

Uncertainty about global growth and a mass sell-off in global equity markets unsettled investors, burnishing gold’s safe-haven qualities, while Japan, Switzerland, Sweden and Denmark have adopted negative interest rates.

European Central Bank (ECB) president Mario Draghi is expected to follow suit at the bank’s March meeting, citing inconsistent growth concerns and non-existent price increases.

Since the decision, Japan lowered deposit rates into negative territory and European Central Bank President Mario Draghi is expected to implement the same policy as soon as March.

Both economic regions are struggling with poor economic growth and non-existent inflation despite billions in easy money and years of near-zero interest rates.

Negative interest rates are generally good for gold as the improbability and agony linked with negative rates tends to surge interest in gold, but the more distinct shift of monetary policy in this direction by central banks is encouraging even greater flows into bullion.

Although it is a shortened week with markets closed Monday for Presidents Day, the U.S. economic calendar will be busy with the release of regional manufacturing reports, housing sector data, and the release of the Consumer Price Index for January.

While analysts are positive on the gold market, they are not ruling out some weakness at the start of the week.

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *